The attorneys at Drummond & Drummond, LLP can assist you with all of your estate planning, estate and trust administration and probate needs.  We work with individuals, couples and families, as well as represent personal representatives, trustees, beneficiaries and heirs throughout the State of Maine.

Maine Estate Planning

Estate Planning is the process of arranging a person’s affairs in anticipation of death or incapacity.  At a minimum, the process involves the preparation of a Last Will and Testament, Durable General Power of Attorney and Advance Health-Care Directive.  Depending upon an individual’s circumstances, it may also include the preparation of a Revocable Trust and/or Irrevocable Trusts. 

The attorneys at Drummond & Drummond, LLP can assist you in preparing your estate planning documents so that they are valid and enforceable under Maine Law, and are specifically tailored to your individual family and financial situation. 

Without an estate plan:

  • The probate court will decide who serves as your guardian and conservator if you become incapacitated.
  • Maine’s intestacy laws will determine who inherits your assets upon your death.
  • The probate court will decide who serves as the guardian and conservator of your minor children and as the personal representative of your estate upon your death.
  • After your death, your estate may pay more in federal and Maine estate taxes.

 We assist clients in preparing a variety of estate planning documents, including:

  • Last Will and Testament
  • Durable General Power of Attorneys
  • Advance Health-Care Directives
  • Health Care Power of Attorneys for Minors
  • Revocable Trusts (aka Living Trusts)
  • Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

 

  • Special Needs Trusts
  • Pet Trusts
  • Charitable Trusts
  • Grantor Retained Trusts
  • Family Limited Liability Companies
  • Business Succession Plans
  • Prenuptial Agreements

 

Maine Probate Administration

Probate is the legal process whereby a decedent’s property is transferred to the heirs or beneficiaries of the estate.  If a decedent had a Will, then he/she is said to have died “testate” and the decedent’s property is distributed in accordance to the terms and conditions of that Will.  If a decedent did not have a Will, then he/she is said to have died “intestate” and the decedent’s property is distributed in accordance with the state law governing intestate estates. 

During the probate process, a personal representative (also known as an executor or administrator) is appointed by the Probate Court, and that person is responsible for settling and distributing the decedent’s estate.  This process typically involves identifying and collecting all estate property, paying the decedent’s debts and taxes, including any estate taxes, settling any creditor claims, and distributing the estate property to the heirs or beneficiaries.

If you are named as the Personal Representative of an Estate, our attorneys can assist you with the probate administration process from start to finish.  If you are an heir or beneficiary of an Estate, we can represent you with respect to any dispute that may arise during the probate administration process, whether it be a Will contest or a dispute about the distribution of estate property.